Eleanor Catton

Eleanor Catton: Eyes wide open

“I believe absolutely that by reading well what you’re doing is confronting people who are unlike you, and the more you read, the greater your understanding of that difference becomes.”

 

Katie Green: Lighter Than My Shadow

Sample pages from Katie’s moving and inspiring hand-drawn memoir of eating disorders, abuse and recovery.

 

Tarn_featureHugh Walpole: The Tarn

“You may say that one novel cannot kill another – but can it not? That conceited, limited, ignorant, self-satisfied crowd of London know-alls can do so much to affect a book’s good or evil fortunes.”

 

Sathnam Sanghera: Novelist on the corner

“Asian writers are asked all the time, why are you writing about shopkeepers and arranged marriages? – they’re clichés. But I love the fact that they’re the same clichés Arnold Bennett wrote about.”

 

histoires_extraordinaires_featureFlávio Carneiro: The curse of Poe

“The beggar told my great grandfather what the book’s former owner had said: never read all of the stories in this book. Misfortune will come to the reader when he turns the last page.”

 

Wodehouse_feature
‘This place is loathsome': Wodehouse in Hollywood

“They set me on to dialogue for a picture for Jack Buchanan. I altered all the characters to Earls and butlers, with such success that, when I had finished, they called a conference and changed the entire plot.”

 

waterFiction 500

Our new micro-fiction series kicks off with Marcelo Moutinho’s ‘Water’, a tender story about an ailing and ageing father.

 

Plus:

John Julius Norwich’s top letter collections, an interview and extract from Ginny and Penelope Skinner’s troubled-teen graphic novel Briony Hatch, new short fiction by Catherine McNamara and Tara Isabella Burton, Tarquin Hall’s favourite India travel guides, Adriana Lisboa’s writer’s life, Mika Provata-Carlone on the latest from Ioanna Karystiani, Martin McLaughlin on a new collection of Italo Calvino essays, a peek at this month in 1660 from Samuel Pepys, and a boisterous return to the 21st century with a selection of South African tabloid newspaper posters from the collection of Laurence Hamburger.